Resolution Conf. 13.2 (Rev. CoP14)

Sustainable use of biodiversity: Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines

WELCOMING the adoption at the seventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD COP7), in Decision VII.12, of the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity, a summary of which is contained in Annex 1;

NOTING that these Principles and Guidelines can be utilized in the implementation by CITES Parties of Article IV and other relevant provisions of the Convention;

RECOGNIZING that CBD and its Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) will be working on case studies to test these Sustainable Use Principles and Guidelines;

RECOGNIZING further that CBD defines, in its Article 2, the term sustainable use as "the use of components of biological diversity in a way and at a rate that does not lead to the long-term decline of biological diversity, thereby maintaining the potential to meet the needs and aspirations of present and future generations";

NOTING further that the vast majority of CITES Parties are Parties to CBD at the time of the 14th meeting of the Conference of the Parties;

WELCOMING further Target 4.3 of the Strategic Plan: future evaluation of progress of CBD (Decision VII.30, Annex 2, Goal 4), which states that "No species of wild flora or fauna is endangered by international trade", and therefore is fully consistent with the CITES Strategic Plan;

RECALLING Resolution Conf. 10.4 (Rev. CoP14) and the Memorandum of Cooperation between CITES and CBD;

 

THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES TO THE CONVENTION

URGES the Parties to:

a) make use of the Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity, also taking into account scientific, trade and enforcement considerations determined by national circumstances, as well as the recommendations of the Animals and Plants Committees (see Annex 2) when adopting non-detriment-making processes and making CITES non-detriment findings;
   
b) share experiences on sustainable use at the national level, particularly between CITES Management and Scientific Authorities, and their CBD Focal Points; and
   
c) endeavour to ensure that their CITES Management and Scientific Authorities participate, through their national CBD Focal Points, in the work of CBD and its Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice (SBSTTA) on these Principles and Guidelines; and

URGES the Parties that are also Parties to the CBD, to take effective measures at policy and institutional level to ensure synergy between their implementation of CITES and CBD at the national level.


Annex 1

Sustainable Use of Biodiversity
Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines
 

Summary

The Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable use of Biodiversity consist of 14 interdependent practical principles, operational guidelines and a few instruments for their implementation that govern the uses of components of biodiversity to ensure the sustainability of such uses. The principles provide a framework to assist Governments, resource managers, indigenous and local communities, the private sector and other stakeholders on how to ensure that their use of the components of biodiversity will not lead to the long-term decline of biological diversity. The principles are intended to be of general relevance, although not all principles will apply equally to all situations, nor will they apply with equal rigour. Their application will vary according to the biodiversity being used, the conditions under which they are being used, and the institutional and cultural context in which the use is taking place.

Sustainability of use of biodiversity components will be enhanced if the following practical principles and related operational guidelines are applied:

Practical principle 1

Supportive policies, laws, and institutions are in place at all levels of governance and there are effective linkages between these levels.

   

Practical principle 2

Recognizing the need for a governing framework consistent with international / national laws, local users of biodiversity components should be sufficiently empowered and supported by rights to be responsible and accountable for use of the resources concerned.

   

Practical principle 3

International, national policies, laws and regulations that distort markets which contribute to habitat degradation or otherwise generate perverse incentives that undermine conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, should be identified and removed or mitigated.

   

Practical principle 4

Adaptive management should be practiced, based on:

a) Science and traditional and local knowledge;
b) Iterative, timely and transparent feedback derived from monitoring the use, environmental, socio-economic impacts, and the status of the resource being used; and
c) Adjusting management based on timely feedback from the monitoring procedures.
   

Practical principle 5

Sustainable use management goals and practices should avoid or minimize adverse impacts on ecosystem services, structure and functions as well as other components of ecosystems.

   

Practical principle 6

Interdisciplinary research into all aspects of the use and conservation of biological diversity should be promoted and supported.

   

Practical principle 7

The spatial and temporal scale of management should be compatible with the ecological and socio-economic scales of the use and its impact.

   

Practical principle 8

There should be arrangements for international cooperation where multinational decision-making and coordination are needed.

   

Practical principle 9

An interdisciplinary, participatory approach should be applied at the appropriate levels of management and governance related to the use.

   

Practical principle 10

International, national policies should take into account:

a) Current and potential values derived from the use of biological diversity;
b) Intrinsic and other non-economic values of biological diversity; and
c) Market forces affecting the values and use.
   

Practical principle 11

Users of biodiversity components should seek to minimize waste and adverse environmental impact and optimize benefits from uses.

   

Practical principle 12

The needs of indigenous and local communities who live with and are affected by the use and conservation of biological diversity, along with their contributions to its conservation and sustainable use, should be reflected in the equitable distribution of the benefits from the use of those resources.

   

Practical principle 13

The costs of management and conservation of biological diversity should be internalized within the area of management and reflected in the distribution of the benefits from the use.

   

Practical principle 14

Education and public awareness programmes on conservation and sustainable use should be implemented and more effective methods of communications should be developed between and among stakeholders and managers.

 


Annex 2

Recommendations of the Animals and Plants Committees
concerning the
Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for
the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity

1. Whereas CBD provides general guidance to Parties on how to address a broad range of biodiversity issues through national implementation, CITES is regulatory in nature, species-specific, and focuses on international trade in wildlife.

2. Although CITES does not have a definition of sustainable use, the case studies show that the elements of the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity that are generally relevant to CITES are either already implicit in the language of CITES or are promoted by CITES. This for instance, refers to practical Principles 1, 2, 4, 7, 9 and 12, elements of which are incorporated in the Checklist to assist in making non-detriment findings for Appendix-II exports.

3. From the case studies presented at the joint session of the 16th meeting of the Plants Committee and 22nd meeting of the Animals Committee (Lima, July 2006), it is evident that the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines are not always immediately applicable to the decision-making process under CITES, particularly with respect to making non-detriment findings (NDF).

4. It is recognized that the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines are, on a case-by-case basis, relevant to the work of CITES (in addition to the Principles referred to in paragraph 3, e.g. Principles 5, 6, 8, 11), and may be considered for possible development of further taxa-specific NDF guidelines.

5. The Animals and Plants Committees propose the amendment of Resolution Conf. 10.4 (Rev. CoP14) to acknowledge the use of the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines for the Sustainable Use of Biodiversity as a voluntary additional tool that can be used in making NDFs.

6. Additionally, questions were raised concerning the work still required by the scientific committees on this matter, and the possible complications of using socio-economic aspects of the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines in the making of non-detrimental findings.

7. It was further noted that the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines could support the existing IUCN guidance for the making of non-detrimental findings, and would be valuable for the development of taxa-specific guidelines in this regard, for instance for tree species.

8. Finally it was recognized that the Addis Ababa Principles and Guidelines, which had been developed over many years and received broad international support, were of global importance but that not all principles were of relevance to CITES.

 

* Amended at the 14th meetings of the Conference of the Parties.

Number / Code: 
Conf. 13.2 (Rev. CoP14)
COP meeting: 
Thirteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties